Thursday, December 4, 2014

ADHD Statistics

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Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a mental disorder that most often occurs in children. Symptoms of ADHD include trouble concentrating, paying attention, staying organized, and remembering details.

 It can be a difficult condition to diagnose. Children with untreated ADHD are sometimes mislabeled as troublemakers or problem children. Make sure you know the basic facts and symptoms of ADHD.

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There are demographic factors that impact the risks of being diagnosed with ADHD.
Children living in households that make less than two times the federal poverty level have a higher risk than children from higher-income households. 


Males are almost three times more likely to be diagnosed with ADHD than females. During their lifetimes, 12.9 percent of men will be diagnosed with the attention disorder. Just 4.9 percent of women will be diagnosed. The average age of ADHD diagnosis is 7 years old. Symptoms of ADHD typically first appear between the ages of 3 and 6. ADHD isn’t just a childhood disorder. Today, about 4 percent of American adults over the age of 18 deal with ADHD on a daily basis.

Different Symptoms

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Boys and girls display very different ADHD symptoms, and boys are much more likely to be diagnosed with the attention disorder. Why? It’s possible the nature of ADHD symptoms in boys makes their condition more noticeable than it is in girls. Boys tend to display externalized symptoms that most people think of when they think of ADHD behavior, for example:

  • impulsivity or “acting out”
  • hyperactivity, such as running and hitting


  • lack of focus, including inattentiveness
  • physical aggression
ADHD in girls is often easy to overlook because it’s not “typical” ADHD behavior. The symptoms aren’t as obvious as they are in boys. They can include:

  • being withdrawn
  • low self-esteem and anxiety
  • intellectual impairment and difficulty with academic achievement
  • inattentiveness or a tendency to “daydream”
  • verbal aggression: teasing, taunting, or name-calling

Ref : http://www.healthline.com/health/adhd/facts-statistics-infographic


1 comment:

  1. ADHD children have their own mind and ideas which sometimes can deal to ADHD behavior problems.

    ReplyDelete